It’s too late for Sebastien. His lifespan was short. But you can gift a longer life to Your Aging Dog

It’s too late for Sebastien. His lifespan was short. But you can gift a longer life to Your Aging Dog

PET CARE

PET CARE

What if you could make your aging dog live longer? What if you could naturally extend lifespan by up to 14% and slow down the diseases of old age like dementia, liver and heart disease, shaking, shivering and panting? What if the pains of doggie old age especially arthritic joint swelling were relived?  What if your dog had more energy to live and to love you? What if you could gift your dog a longer life and more comfortable senior years at home with you?

What if you could make your aging dog live longer? What if you could naturally extend lifespan by up to 14% and slow down the diseases of old age like dementia, liver and heart disease, shaking, shivering and panting? What if the pains of doggie old age especially arthritic joint swelling were relived?  What if your dog had more energy to live and to love you? What if you could gift your dog a longer life and more comfortable senior years at home with you?

Sebastien, our Golden Retriever, died at 11 years of age. This article is in memory of him. He could have lived a longer,  more comfortable, more pain free old age. And, perhaps, too, he might have fallen asleep in the beloved home he grew up in surrounded by people he loved. But it was not to be.

Sebastien, our Golden Retriever, died at 11 years of age. This article is in memory of him. He could have lived a longer,  more comfortable, more pain free old age. And, perhaps, too, he might have fallen asleep in the beloved home he grew up in surrounded by people he loved. But it was not to be.

If you’ve ever had the good fortune to friend a dog you’ll know the incredible bonds that form, the unbelievable relationship that grows, and finally, at journey’s end, the pain of saying goodbye.

 The pain of loss, the death of perhaps one of the closest friends you’ll ever have; that is the price,  paid in full,  for a love shared.

 Like us, our furry friends are living longer. But like us, as they age, they suffer the pain and infirmities longer life brings. We get more time together.  But the price can be incontinence, loss of mobility and increased risk for disease. It means heightened stress and anxiety for pooch and ever increasing strain on you. 

 Most dogs enter their senior years at around 7 years old, a little sooner for larger dog breeds. They begin to slow down, they may gain weight more easily, their senses start to dull. Often it takes us by surprise. We are unaware…..

If you’ve ever had the good fortune to friend a dog you’ll know the incredible bonds that form, the unbelievable relationship that grows, and finally, at journey’s end, the pain of saying goodbye.

 The pain of loss, the death of perhaps one of the closest friends you’ll ever have; that is the price,  paid in full,  for a love shared.

 Like us, our furry friends are living longer. But like us, as they age, they suffer the pain and infirmities longer life brings. We get more time together.  But the price can be incontinence, loss of mobility and increased risk for disease. It means heightened stress and anxiety for pooch and ever increasing strain on you. 

 Most dogs enter their senior years at around 7 years old, a little sooner for larger dog breeds. They begin to slow down, they may gain weight more easily, their senses start to dull. Often it takes us by surprise. We are unaware…..

Even though you know why these things happen it does not stop your heart breaking…………………but

 

THINK ABOUT THIS

 

 

What if You Could Gift Your Dog a Longer Life and More Comfortable Old Age?

Even though you know why these things happen it does not stop your heart breaking…………………but

 

THINK ABOUT THIS

 

 

What if You Could Gift Your Dog a Longer Life and More Comfortable Old Age?

Give Your Dog a Longer, Healthier, Happier Life

Give Your Dog a Longer, Healthier, Happier Life

What if you and your best friend could change things for the better? What if you could help your dog live a generally healthier and more active life for longer whilst combatting the ills of old age so your old friends quality of life did not suffer as much? Whilst none of us will live forever, the life we do live, we can live well!

What if you and your best friend could change things for the better? What if you could help your dog live a generally healthier and more active life for longer whilst combatting the ills of old age so your old friends quality of life did not suffer as much? Whilst none of us will live forever, the life we do live, we can live well!

 Jan 31, 2020 | Adrian McKeon

 Jan 31, 2020 | Adrian McKeon

What would you do one day if your dog said to you ‘I can’t see well anymore. And I can’t hear as well either. Please. What’s happening to me?’

What would you do one day if your dog said to you ‘I can’t see well anymore. And I can’t hear as well either. Please. What’s happening to me?’

You’ve been thinking your dog doesn’t love you and is ignoring you. In reality he can’t hear you calling like he did all those years ago. And he can’t see the ball you just threw. He just feels your sadness and distress.

You’ve been thinking your dog doesn’t love you and is ignoring you. In reality he can’t hear you calling like he did all those years ago. And he can’t see the ball you just threw. He just feels your sadness and distress.

And what if your dog said ‘I’m a little anxious – please help me.’

And what if your dog said ‘I’m a little anxious – please help me.’

Senior dogs have a hard time handling stress. It gradually creeps up. Things that didn’t cause bother in past times – noises, new people, strange places, changes in routine – cause anxiety. You adapt. He becomes anxious, agitated and irritable.

Senior dogs have a hard time handling stress. It gradually creeps up. Things that didn’t cause bother in past times – noises, new people, strange places, changes in routine – cause anxiety. You adapt. He becomes anxious, agitated and irritable.

Out of the blue your dog says to you ‘I get cold more easily now and my joints hurt when I move. I’m so sorry I’m not the dog I used to be. Please help.’

Out of the blue your dog says to you ‘I get cold more easily now and my joints hurt when I move. I’m so sorry I’m not the dog I used to be. Please help.’

Your all weather dog is getting on and can’t regulate his body temperature. This force of nature used to running through the snow in the chilly dawn now has stiff painful joints as low temperatures ravage his arthritis flare ups. Sometimes joint pain is so bad he can’t climb up or down stairs or even into the car let alone go out in the cold.

Your all weather dog is getting on and can’t regulate his body temperature. This force of nature used to running through the snow in the chilly dawn now has stiff painful joints as low temperatures ravage his arthritis flare ups. Sometimes joint pain is so bad he can’t climb up or down stairs or even into the car let alone go out in the cold.

Finally, one day your dog looks at you and says “I get confused at times and I’m even forgetting some of the old rules we’ve always shared. Please forgive me.”

Finally, one day your dog looks at you and says “I get confused at times and I’m even forgetting some of the old rules we’ve always shared. Please forgive me.”

Loss of cognitive ability is common when dogs age.  He might forget simple things like the tricks he knows. Or forget long known behaviours like being house trained. He might even begin to act strangely or simply confused.

Loss of cognitive ability is common when dogs age.  He might forget simple things like the tricks he knows. Or forget long known behaviours like being house trained. He might even begin to act strangely or simply confused.

You can help give your dog a longer, healthy, happier life. Here’s how.

 

Recent advances in medicine have linked aging to disease and identified a natural drug – rapamycin – which increases the lifespan and healthspan of yeast, nematodes, fruit flies, and mice. In mammals the average lifespan increase is 9% to 14%.

 

Rapamycin is an FDA-approved drug that has been used clinically in human medicine since 2007 to prevent organ transplant rejection. It has also been shown to improve a variety of age-associated conditions, including reducing cancer incidence, improving cognitive function, reversing cardiac and immune declines, restoring stem cell function, and improving muscle function in aged animals. 

 

What, you might think, has that got to do with dogs? Well, the thing is, rapamycin is believed to work safely not just on mice but on all mammals! 

 

Limited studies in dogs indicate that low doses of rapamycin (0.08 mg/kg/day) are well tolerated and the Dog Aging Project at the University of Washington treated dogs with 1 mg/kg/day rapamycin for 14 months without side effects. Taken together, these observations raise the possibility that rapamycin could reduce morbidity and mortality in larger animals, including dogs and people. 

 

For example, one recent study with humans found that just 6 weeks of treatment with rapamycin rejuvenated immune functions in healthy elderly people. A randomized double-blind veterinary clinical trial to assess dosing, safety, and effects of rapamycin treatment for 10 weeks in healthy middle-aged dogs did not cause significant side effects but did result in favourable changes in cardiac functions. These results are highly similar to results in trials with middle aged mice.

 The message is clear. Rapamycin interventions delay or reverse molecular mechanisms of aging and have potential to greatly improve health for dogs and humans alike. 

You can help give your dog a longer, healthy, happier life. Here’s how.

 

Recent advances in medicine have linked aging to disease and identified a natural drug – rapamycin – which increases the lifespan and healthspan of yeast, nematodes, fruit flies, and mice. In mammals the average lifespan increase is 9% to 14%.

 

Rapamycin is an FDA-approved drug that has been used clinically in human medicine since 2007 to prevent organ transplant rejection. It has also been shown to improve a variety of age-associated conditions, including reducing cancer incidence, improving cognitive function, reversing cardiac and immune declines, restoring stem cell function, and improving muscle function in aged animals. 

 

What, you might think, has that got to do with dogs? Well, the thing is, rapamycin is believed to work safely not just on mice but on all mammals! 

 

Limited studies in dogs indicate that low doses of rapamycin (0.08 mg/kg/day) are well tolerated and the Dog Aging Project at the University of Washington treated dogs with 1 mg/kg/day rapamycin for 14 months without side effects. Taken together, these observations raise the possibility that rapamycin could reduce morbidity and mortality in larger animals, including dogs and people. 

 

For example, one recent study with humans found that just 6 weeks of treatment with rapamycin rejuvenated immune functions in healthy elderly people. A randomized double-blind veterinary clinical trial to assess dosing, safety, and effects of rapamycin treatment for 10 weeks in healthy middle-aged dogs did not cause significant side effects but did result in favourable changes in cardiac functions. These results are highly similar to results in trials with middle aged mice.

 The message is clear. Rapamycin interventions delay or reverse molecular mechanisms of aging and have potential to greatly improve health for dogs and humans alike. 

However, it must be noted, the Dog Aging Project was a small sample of only 23 dogs. Study of a larger sample is ongoing. Whilst results are expected to be the same only larger volumes can provide gold standard strict clinical evidence.

Once you‘ve taken that onboard, take a look at the comments of dog owners in the trial! By the way, don’t worry if your pooch is not in the breeds listed. The key issue is that your dog is a mammal – which it is! For me, also, it is the comments of dog owners that carry a lot of weight. But decide for yourself.

However, it must be noted, the Dog Aging Project was a small sample of only 23 dogs. Study of a larger sample is ongoing. Whilst results are expected to be the same only larger volumes can provide gold standard strict clinical evidence.

Once you‘ve taken that onboard, take a look at the comments of dog owners in the trial! By the way, don’t worry if your pooch is not in the breeds listed. The key issue is that your dog is a mammal – which it is! For me, also, it is the comments of dog owners that carry a lot of weight. But decide for yourself.

Chow

Doberman

English bulldog

Golden Retriever

Great Dane

Labrador retriever

Mixed breed

Standard poodle

Wheaten terrier

Chow

Doberman

English bulldog

Golden Retriever

Great Dane

Labrador retriever

Mixed breed

Standard poodle

Wheaten terrier

  • 70% of owners reported their dog displayed increased activity and energy. This reflects results in mice. And also from owners who have independently begun treating their dogs with rapamycin
  • 60% of owners reported their dogs behaviour became more affectionate – clinicians think this might be down to arthritis pain reduction
  • In response to owner comments clinicians also suggested rapamycin improved cognitive functions leading to increased affection from dogs
  • 70% of owners reported their dog displayed increased activity and energy. This reflects results in mice. And also from owners who have independently begun treating their dogs with rapamycin
  • 60% of owners reported their dogs behaviour became more affectionate – clinicians think this might be down to arthritis pain reduction
  • In response to owner comments clinicians also suggested rapamycin improved cognitive functions leading to increased affection from dogs

Owner Comments from Dog Aging Project, University of Washington

Owner Comments from Dog Aging Project, University of Washington

Breeds in project

Breeds in project

The Dog Aging Project provides the first evidence that rapamycin may partially reverse age-related heart dysfunction in dogs.  Its results for older dogs are consistent with a reversal of age-related functional changes.

The Dog Aging Project provides the first evidence that rapamycin may partially reverse age-related heart dysfunction in dogs.  Its results for older dogs are consistent with a reversal of age-related functional changes.

To summarize, the initial Dog Aging Project study of rapamycin in healthy, middle-aged dogs showed that low-dose rapamycin treatment is safe over a period of 10 weeks and appears to mimic beneficial effects described for  mice. Further studies with dogs already suffering from disease showed no side effects with daily doses administered over 14 months and definite measurable health benefits. The low number of dogs limit statistical forecasting but the absence of significant side effects is consistent with findings from studies on marmosets in captivity as well as prior studies of rapamycin in dogs. 

To summarize, the initial Dog Aging Project study of rapamycin in healthy, middle-aged dogs showed that low-dose rapamycin treatment is safe over a period of 10 weeks and appears to mimic beneficial effects described for  mice. Further studies with dogs already suffering from disease showed no side effects with daily doses administered over 14 months and definite measurable health benefits. The low number of dogs limit statistical forecasting but the absence of significant side effects is consistent with findings from studies on marmosets in captivity as well as prior studies of rapamycin in dogs. 

The dogs in the Dog Aging Project study were living in their normal home environment, providing an important demonstration that rapamycin can be safely administered to dogs with the potential for significant health benefits.

The dogs in the Dog Aging Project study were living in their normal home environment, providing an important demonstration that rapamycin can be safely administered to dogs with the potential for significant health benefits.

What about side effects? What are the risks?

What about side effects? What are the risks?

Rapamycin is a molecule produced naturally by the mycelial bacterium Streptomyces hygroscopicus, which was discovered on Easter Island in 1975. Rapamycin studies show it can significantly extend lifespan in mammals, even when taken in later life, with increases in life expectancy for males and females of between 9% and 14% respectively.

 

So why hasn’t the discovery of the anti-aging properties of rapamycin changed the world? I think it is because most studies done to date have been small scale. Large gold standard studies are incredibly expensive and rapamycin is out of patent so there is no incentive for the big pharma to get involved.

 

After all, no real side effects preclude their use as anti-aging drugs today. Indeed, rapamycin was approved by the FDA for human treatment in 2007! And, of course, the alternative to any side effects are the effects of aging: cancer, stroke, infarction, blindness and premature death. 

Rapamycin is a molecule produced naturally by the mycelial bacterium Streptomyces hygroscopicus, which was discovered on Easter Island in 1975. Rapamycin studies show it can significantly extend lifespan in mammals, even when taken in later life, with increases in life expectancy for males and females of between 9% and 14% respectively.

 

So why hasn’t the discovery of the anti-aging properties of rapamycin changed the world? I think it is because most studies done to date have been small scale. Large gold standard studies are incredibly expensive and rapamycin is out of patent so there is no incentive for the big pharma to get involved.

 

After all, no real side effects preclude their use as anti-aging drugs today. Indeed, rapamycin was approved by the FDA for human treatment in 2007! And, of course, the alternative to any side effects are the effects of aging: cancer, stroke, infarction, blindness and premature death. 

Research suggests the potential benefits of rapamycin far outweigh any risks associated with taking it.

Research suggests the potential benefits of rapamycin far outweigh any risks associated with taking it.

Potential side effects of rapamycin cannot be ignored of course. They include anaemia, fatigue and leukopenia, hyperglycaemia, stomatitis and mycositis. These were identified in the treatment of cancer patients given very high doses of rapamycin to fight cancer and prevent organ rejection after a transplant.

 

In reality, if used properly, rapamycin is not much more dangerous than ordinary aspirin.

 

Aspirin can have numerous side effects if taken in high doses including gastric bleeding, confusion, seizure, vomiting, coughing up blood, fever and swelling. Yet millions take baby aspirin daily to prevent cardiovascular disease and to cut the risk of cancer by at least 25%  - I do!! It is calculated that the benefits of  aspirin are greater than their risks. I believe the benefits of the anti-aging effects of rapamycin may be even greater.

 

It is all a matter of judgement. Your judgement.

 

Nearly all drugs can be fatal if given at sufficiently high levels. All trials of rapamycin on mice, humans and dogs mentioned in this article involved low level doses in order to achieve maximum benefits. In fact, when an 18 year old attempted suicide taking 103 Rapamycin tablets the only impact was a slightly raised cholesterol level.

 

Studies suggest to achieve maximum gains the key factor is to maintain the level of rapamycin in the blood. This means taking small doses – baby rapamycin tablets -  on a regular basis, instead of huge doses infrequently. Beyond that, maximum benefits may not accrue:-

Potential side effects of rapamycin cannot be ignored of course. They include anaemia, fatigue and leukopenia, hyperglycaemia, stomatitis and mycositis. These were identified in the treatment of cancer patients given very high doses of rapamycin to fight cancer and prevent organ rejection after a transplant.

 

In reality, if used properly, rapamycin is not much more dangerous than ordinary aspirin.

 

Aspirin can have numerous side effects if taken in high doses including gastric bleeding, confusion, seizure, vomiting, coughing up blood, fever and swelling. Yet millions take baby aspirin daily to prevent cardiovascular disease and to cut the risk of cancer by at least 25%  - I do!! It is calculated that the benefits of  aspirin are greater than their risks. I believe the benefits of the anti-aging effects of rapamycin may be even greater.

 

It is all a matter of judgement. Your judgement.

 

Nearly all drugs can be fatal if given at sufficiently high levels. All trials of rapamycin on mice, humans and dogs mentioned in this article involved low level doses in order to achieve maximum benefits. In fact, when an 18 year old attempted suicide taking 103 Rapamycin tablets the only impact was a slightly raised cholesterol level.

 

Studies suggest to achieve maximum gains the key factor is to maintain the level of rapamycin in the blood. This means taking small doses – baby rapamycin tablets -  on a regular basis, instead of huge doses infrequently. Beyond that, maximum benefits may not accrue:-

Studies suggest a low level dose of rapamycin given regularly will maximise benefits. Net benefits may decrease at higher doses.

Studies suggest a low level dose of rapamycin given regularly will maximise benefits. Net benefits may decrease at higher doses.

I suspect it is more dangerous not to use anti-aging drugs than to use them. As rapamycin has already been implemented for potential life extension in humans you might agree and come to the conclusion that for you and your dog  “the time is now”.

I suspect it is more dangerous not to use anti-aging drugs than to use them. As rapamycin has already been implemented for potential life extension in humans you might agree and come to the conclusion that for you and your dog  “the time is now”.

In Conclusion

In Conclusion

The overwhelming evidence suggests that rapamycin is a universal anti-aging drug – that is, it extends lifespan in all tested models from yeast to mammals, suppresses cell senescence and delays the onset of age-related diseases. This is the product of thousands of scientists working independently all over the world. 

 

Like aspirin, the side effects of rapamycin are minimal when doses are small and maximum gains come from regular small doses

  

So is rapamycin suitable for your dog?

 

The Dog Aging Project at the University of Washington Phase I trial of rapamycin on dogs treated with rapamycin at 1 mg/kg/day for 14 months found no significant side effects. Indeed, this article is based on that research.

 

Rapamycin is better at slowing down aging than reversing it so is most effective when administered as early as possible. The question arises - is it too late to take rapamycin in middle or old doggy age? Actually, it is not too late. Even if one or a few age-related diseases renders aging unhealthy, other potential diseases are still at pre-disease stages, and anti-aging drugs may delay their development. And they may slow down further progression of existing overt diseases.

The overwhelming evidence suggests that rapamycin is a universal anti-aging drug – that is, it extends lifespan in all tested models from yeast to mammals, suppresses cell senescence and delays the onset of age-related diseases. This is the product of thousands of scientists working independently all over the world. 

 

Like aspirin, the side effects of rapamycin are minimal when doses are small and maximum gains come from regular small doses

  

So is rapamycin suitable for your dog?

 

The Dog Aging Project at the University of Washington Phase I trial of rapamycin on dogs treated with rapamycin at 1 mg/kg/day for 14 months found no significant side effects. Indeed, this article is based on that research.

 

Rapamycin is better at slowing down aging than reversing it so is most effective when administered as early as possible. The question arises - is it too late to take rapamycin in middle or old doggy age? Actually, it is not too late. Even if one or a few age-related diseases renders aging unhealthy, other potential diseases are still at pre-disease stages, and anti-aging drugs may delay their development. And they may slow down further progression of existing overt diseases.

At what stage of life is rapamycin most effective? Standard medicine extends life span by preventing death from disease. Anti-aging medicine like rapamycin is most effective when given before disease sets in because it can act to delay onset. However, it can deliver health benefits at any stage whilst also delaying progress of diseases already present.

At what stage of life is rapamycin most effective? Standard medicine extends life span by preventing death from disease. Anti-aging medicine like rapamycin is most effective when given before disease sets in because it can act to delay onset. However, it can deliver health benefits at any stage whilst also delaying progress of diseases already present.

Indeed some researchers observe not taking rapamycin may be as dangerous as smoking. Heavy smoking shortens life expectancy by 6-10 years. Simply not smoking prolongs life by 6-10 years. In middle-aged mice, just 3 months of high-dose rapamycin treatment increased life expectancy up to 60%. When taken late in life, rapamycin increases lifespan by 9-14% i.e. an extra 7 years of human life.

 

This suggests you could add perhaps 2-3 years to the life of your dog.

 

 So which companies supply this wonder drug? That is the problem. As rapamycin is a natural substance and is out of patent, fraudulent production and supply is rife on the internet and even Amazon cannot stamp it out. In addition, most quality suppliers are “commercial only” supplying labs.  I’ve found a reputable supplier providing a certified, traceable rapamycin medicine to consumers, made in a GMP licensed lab in the USA together with a certificate of analysis.

 

Supersmart is a French company which has been going for 27 years, has a 5 star TrustPilot rating, is compliant with drugs administration authorities around the world, has an enviable reputation supplying  pharmaceutical grade products at optimal doses to a global audience and excellent customer service!

Indeed some researchers observe not taking rapamycin may be as dangerous as smoking. Heavy smoking shortens life expectancy by 6-10 years. Simply not smoking prolongs life by 6-10 years. In middle-aged mice, just 3 months of high-dose rapamycin treatment increased life expectancy up to 60%. When taken late in life, rapamycin increases lifespan by 9-14% i.e. an extra 7 years of human life.

 

This suggests you could add perhaps 2-3 years to the life of your dog.

 

 So which companies supply this wonder drug? That is the problem. As rapamycin is a natural substance and is out of patent, fraudulent production and supply is rife on the internet and even Amazon cannot stamp it out. In addition, most quality suppliers are “commercial only” supplying labs.  I’ve found a reputable supplier providing a certified, traceable rapamycin medicine to consumers, made in a GMP licensed lab in the USA together with a certificate of analysis.

 

Supersmart is a French company which has been going for 27 years, has a 5 star TrustPilot rating, is compliant with drugs administration authorities around the world, has an enviable reputation supplying  pharmaceutical grade products at optimal doses to a global audience and excellent customer service!

And the cost? Supersmart is always doing good offers but expect to pay around $56 (£42) for a 90 day supply. This is around 1/3 the monthly cost of pet insurance. I figure in  the long term we’ll get that back in terms of oodles of extra doggy love, fewer trips to the Vet and lower insurance premiums!

 

The question remains: Is it for your pooch? Do you want to help your dog increase its healthspan, its lifespan and its period of life spent free from disease? Then make the call. 

 

“If you wait until you are ready, it is almost certainly too late.”

 Seth Godin

 

 

And what of Sebastien? At any family gathering mention Sebastian’s name and ripples of laughter amid old stories fill the room with good companionship and cheer.

Not a bad legacy to leave behind! 

And the cost? Supersmart is always doing good offers but expect to pay around $56 (£42) for a 90 day supply. This is around 1/3 the monthly cost of pet insurance. I figure in  the long term we’ll get that back in terms of oodles of extra doggy love, fewer trips to the Vet and lower insurance premiums!

 

The question remains: Is it for your pooch? Do you want to help your dog increase its healthspan, its lifespan and its period of life spent free from disease? Then make the call. 

 

“If you wait until you are ready, it is almost certainly too late.”

 Seth Godin

 

 

And what of Sebastien? At any family gathering mention Sebastian’s name and ripples of laughter amid old stories fill the room with good companionship and cheer.

Not a bad legacy to leave behind! 

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